Clear Health Centers

Investigating Underlying Causes

Providing Natural Therapies

Clear Health Centers

Investigating Underlying Causes

Providing Natural Therapies

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia Syndrome has reached epidemic proportions with women being those primarily affected.

With the first research article written by Dr. Yunis, MD, in 1981, how can it be that we now have an estimated 10 million people diagnosed with this condition just 40 years later?

Our standard medical system considers Fibromyalgia to be incurable, but we beg to differ, since there are effective alternative options which are outlined on this page.

Fibromyalgia Historical Perspective

The National Fibromyalgia Association estimates that approximately 10 million people in the United States have Fibromyalgia and is one of the most common chronic pain conditions.

It is estimated that 3-6% of the world population, that’s 225 million people calculated at 3%, have been diagnosed, with the most prevalent being women.

How is this possible?

What are the causes for why this condition has reached epidemic proportions, and why primarily women

Dr. Harvey Moldofsky, MD, in 1975, proposed a relationship between the deprivation of Stage 4 sleep (REM or Rapid Eye Movement) and the typical pain presentation of Fibromyalgia.

Dr. Hugh Smith, MD, in 1977, classified the 18 tender points of Fibromyalgia.

The first published paper on Fibromyalgia was in 1981 by Dr. Yunis, MD.

So within 40 years of the first published paper we have a condition affecting millions of people suffering from the debilitating physical and mental symptoms of Fibromyalgia. 

Most of the information out there deals with statistics, diagnostic criteria, coping with symptoms, and prescriptions, but if we can understand the various causes, then there’s a good chance this condition can be cured, or, at least ameliorated to some degree, even though the medical profession considers Fibro to be incurable.

Most Common Cause

The most common cause or origin of Fibromyalgia is physical trauma.

  • Cervical trauma to the neck
  • Concussion (brain)
  • Surgeries; intubation, fusions and removal of discs
  • Trauma from a lifting accident
  • Overstretching of muscles, usually work related

Any of the above can cause herniated discs with cracks in the surrounding annular ring.

When this happens, a highly corrosive, inflammatory liquid, called Substance P, is released into the surrounding tissues.

This causes localized nerve inflammation and cellular damage.

As a result, mast cells are triggered to release histamine which leads to vascular permeability and a hyperreactive immune response.

Because the spinal column has nerves running upwards to the brain (afferent) and nerves running from the brain throughout the body (efferent), this localized issue spreads, having detrimental effects upon both the brain and the body.

This fact is important to remember with Fibromyalgia.

In this case, most symptoms experienced in the body are actually originating in the spine and brain.

Here we differentiate between ‘upstream’ causes and ‘downstream’ effects or symptoms.

Challenges to Treatment

Over the last few decades of working with Fibro patients, Haskell had always been addressing these downstream biochemical and hormonal issues with digestive enzymes, nutrients to heal the gut, thyroid hormones, adrenal support, bioidentical female hormones, herbals for sleep, and the list goes on and on.

Patients would feel better, but we had to constantly make adjustments to their protocols, and Haskell knew he was only managing their symptoms.

The origin of symptoms had to be upstream in the brain.

We had to figure out a way to treat the underlying brain and nervous system issues.

Finally… finally Haskell heard of Dr. McMakin’s work using Frequency Specific Microcurrents (FSM), and the last piece of the puzzle was put into place.

Finally there was a way to treat the brain and spinal column, a way to reduce inflammation, and a way to reduce scar tissue resulting from trauma, hemorrhaging and inflammation.

Finally a way to improve the function of both the hypothalamus and pituitary, a way to reduce pain and Substance P, and a way to reduce the inflammatory markers IL-1 and IL-6 and inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha).

Finally a way to increase ATP (energy) production by mitochondria, and a way to increase the body’s own pain suppressors (beta endorphins).

A pharmaceutical prescription may be necessary at times to relieve symptoms, but it can never restore physical and mental health. 

The role of a typical holistic or functional physician will be to primarily manage downstream symptoms, like we were doing for decades.

The ONLY way you will ever have the possibility of recovering your health is by addressing the upstream brain and Central Nervous System issues through FSM.

Does FSM promise a total cure?

No, but its cure rate is much higher than any other approach we know of.

ANS & CNS

We have two primary nervous systems, the Autonomic Nervous System and the Central Nervous System, which basically regulate every tissue and gland in the body.

The ANS is divided into two branches, the sympathetic (fight or flight) and the parasympathetic (rest and digest). 

There is normally a harmonious relationship between these branches. 

The Central Nervous System, the one we are primarily interested in with regards to Fibromyalgia, also influences this ANS. 

It integrates the received information from distal nerve endings, coordinates an adaptive response and controls various functions of the body through the efferent nerves and the ANS.

The CNS also modulates and modifies the release of various hormones.

It’s response to pain and inflammation is to activate the hypothalamus gland in the brain to increase its secretion of CRH (Corticotropin Releasing Hormone), which tells the pituitary to secrete ACTH (Adrenocorticotropin Hormone), the hormone which tells the adrenals to make cortisol, our body’s own natural anti-inflammatory hormone.

This is a normal, healthy response to stress, pain and inflammation.

But in life, a trigger which increases cortisol production should be brief, not unremitting.

With chronic pain, cortisol will remain elevated with specific consequences. 

  • Thinning of the intestinal lining leading to gut permeability.
  • Decreased production of the stomach enzyme hydrochloric acid, causing poor digestion and decreased absorption of nutrients.
  • Overriding of the vagus nerve causing mood swings, poor immune response, sleep issues, and an irregular heart rate.
  • Thyroid issues with poor conversion of T4 to T3.
  • Changes in gut pH leading to Candida overgrowth and SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth).
  • Impaired brain function and poor short-term memory.

When in pain, our ANS shifts into the sympathetic branch, and the body is not thinking about reproduction.

It is thinking survival.

There’s a decline in the production of hormones like Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone, leading to a decline in progesterone, testosterone and DHEA. 

Common symptoms are the following;

  • Estrogen dominance
  • Mood swings
  • Lack of sexual interest
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia, making everything worse
  • Fatigue
  • PMS

With sleep issues, growth hormone production declines.

  • Poor muscle tone
  • Poor muscle repair
  • Anxiety and or depression
  • Lowered interest in sex
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Dry skin
  • Fatigue
  • Weight gain

The thyroid hormone TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) declines with all the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

  • Weight gain
  • Hair loss
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Poor digestion
  • Water retention

There are also alterations in immune function with an increase in allergies to everything, environmental chemicals, molds and foods.

Fibromyalgia Diagnosis

The diagnosis of Fibromyalgia is dependent upon the patient’s subjective descriptions of their symptoms and the physician’s exam, because there isn’t a blood test to confirm Fibromyalgia.

Without an objective way to confirm the diagnosis, the physician is often left with ruling out other similar conditions. 

Since Fibro is progressive, the early stages may not present with all the classic symptoms, and a physician may simply give the diagnosis of Fibro out of confusion, frustration and convenience.

To make this even more complicated, not everyone with the diagnosis of Fibromyalgia has the same symptoms.

The degree of pain and the extent of insomnia and fatigue varies from one person to the next. 

Other issues can be present as well, such as sensitivity to smells, bright lights, sounds, weather changes, to heat and cold, and to various foods.

Much research points towards the nervous system, specifically a ‘central’ problem, with pain and sensory processing issues located within the brain.

Even though a high percentage of people developed Fibromyalgia from the primary cause of spinal trauma, other origins do exist.

Secondary or Less Common Causes

We hesitate to say these are actually causes, though we’ve seen some patients where they were, but many of them simply accelerate the progression and intensity of symptoms.

  • Toxic chemical exposures
  • Intense chronic stress
  • Food allergies
  • Low-grade chronic infections
  • Parasites
  • Female hormone deficiencies
  • Injury to the ears, specifically the vestibular apparatus
  • Mold
  • Sleep apnea

Often there isn’t just one of these causes involved, but a combination of several.

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia Syndrome has reached epidemic proportions with women being those primarily affected.

With the first research article written by Dr. Yunis, MD, in 1981, how can it be that we now have an estimated 10 million people diagnosed with this condition just 40 years later?

Our standard medical system considers Fibromyalgia to be incurable, but we beg to differ, since there are effective alternative options which are outlined on this page.

Fibromyalgia Historical Perspective

The National Fibromyalgia Association estimates that approximately 10 million people in the United States have Fibromyalgia and is one of the most common chronic pain conditions.

It is estimated that 3-6% of the world population, that’s 225 million people calculated at 3%, have been diagnosed, with the most prevalent being women.

How is this possible?

What are the causes for why this condition has reached epidemic proportions, and why primarily women

Dr. Harvey Moldofsky, MD, in 1975, proposed a relationship between the deprivation of Stage 4 sleep (REM or Rapid Eye Movement) and the typical pain presentation of Fibromyalgia.

Dr. Hugh Smith, MD, in 1977, classified the 18 tender points of Fibromyalgia.

The first published paper on Fibromyalgia was in 1981 by Dr. Yunis, MD.

So within 40 years of the first published paper we have a condition affecting millions of people suffering from the debilitating physical and mental symptoms of Fibromyalgia. 

Most of the information out there deals with statistics, diagnostic criteria, coping with symptoms, and prescriptions, but if we can understand the various causes, then there’s a good chance this condition can be cured, or, at least ameliorated to some degree, even though the medical profession considers Fibro to be incurable.

Most Common Cause

The most common cause or origin of Fibromyalgia is physical trauma.

  • Cervical trauma to the neck
  • Concussion (brain)
  • Surgeries; intubation, fusions and removal of discs
  • Trauma from a lifting accident
  • Overstretching of muscles, usually work related

Any of the above can cause herniated discs with cracks in the surrounding annular ring.

When this happens, a highly corrosive, inflammatory liquid, called Substance P, is released into the surrounding tissues.

This causes localized nerve inflammation and cellular damage.

As a result, mast cells are triggered to release histamine which leads to vascular permeability and a hyperreactive immune response.

Because the spinal column has nerves running upwards to the brain (afferent) and nerves running from the brain throughout the body (efferent), this localized issue spreads, having detrimental effects upon both the brain and the body.

This fact is important to remember with Fibromyalgia.

In this case, most symptoms experienced in the body are actually originating in the spine and brain.

Here we differentiate between ‘upstream’ causes and ‘downstream’ effects or symptoms.

Challenges to Treatment

Over the last few decades of working with Fibro patients, Haskell had always been addressing these downstream biochemical and hormonal issues with digestive enzymes, nutrients to heal the gut, thyroid hormones, adrenal support, bioidentical female hormones, herbals for sleep, and the list goes on and on.

Patients would feel better, but we had to constantly make adjustments to their protocols, and Haskell knew he was only managing their symptoms.

The origin of symptoms had to be upstream in the brain.

We had to figure out a way to treat the underlying brain and nervous system issues.

Finally… finally Haskell heard of Dr. McMakin’s work using Frequency Specific Microcurrents (FSM), and the last piece of the puzzle was put into place.

Finally there was a way to treat the brain and spinal column, a way to reduce inflammation, and a way to reduce scar tissue resulting from trauma, hemorrhaging and inflammation.

Finally a way to improve the function of both the hypothalamus and pituitary, a way to reduce pain and Substance P, and a way to reduce the inflammatory markers IL-1 and IL-6 and inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha).

Finally a way to increase ATP (energy) production by mitochondria, and a way to increase the body’s own pain suppressors (beta endorphins).

A pharmaceutical prescription may be necessary at times to relieve symptoms, but it can never restore physical and mental health. 

The role of a typical holistic or functional physician will be to primarily manage downstream symptoms, like we were doing for decades.

The ONLY way you will ever have the possibility of recovering your health is by addressing the upstream brain and Central Nervous System issues through FSM.

Does FSM promise a total cure?

No, but its cure rate is much higher than any other approach we know of.

ANS & CNS

We have two primary nervous systems, the Autonomic Nervous System and the Central Nervous System, which basically regulate every tissue and gland in the body.

The ANS is divided into two branches, the sympathetic (fight or flight) and the parasympathetic (rest and digest). 

There is normally a harmonious relationship between these branches. 

The Central Nervous System, the one we are primarily interested in with regards to Fibromyalgia, also influences this ANS. 

It integrates the received information from distal nerve endings, coordinates an adaptive response and controls various functions of the body through the efferent nerves and the ANS.

The CNS also modulates and modifies the release of various hormones.

It’s response to pain and inflammation is to activate the hypothalamus gland in the brain to increase its secretion of CRH (Corticotropin Releasing Hormone), which tells the pituitary to secrete ACTH (Adrenocorticotropin Hormone), the hormone which tells the adrenals to make cortisol, our body’s own natural anti-inflammatory hormone.

This is a normal, healthy response to stress, pain and inflammation.

But in life, a trigger which increases cortisol production should be brief, not unremitting.

With chronic pain, cortisol will remain elevated with specific consequences. 

  • Thinning of the intestinal lining leading to gut permeability.
  • Decreased production of the stomach enzyme hydrochloric acid, causing poor digestion and decreased absorption of nutrients.
  • Overriding of the vagus nerve causing mood swings, poor immune response, sleep issues, and an irregular heart rate.
  • Thyroid issues with poor conversion of T4 to T3.
  • Changes in gut pH leading to Candida overgrowth and SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth).
  • Impaired brain function and poor short-term memory.

When in pain, our ANS shifts into the sympathetic branch, and the body is not thinking about reproduction.

It is thinking survival.

There’s a decline in the production of hormones like Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone, leading to a decline in progesterone, testosterone and DHEA. 

Common symptoms are the following;

  • Estrogen dominance
  • Mood swings
  • Lack of sexual interest
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia, making everything worse
  • Fatigue
  • PMS

With sleep issues, growth hormone production declines.

  • Poor muscle tone
  • Poor muscle repair
  • Anxiety and or depression
  • Lowered interest in sex
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Dry skin
  • Fatigue
  • Weight gain

The thyroid hormone TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) declines with all the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

  • Weight gain
  • Hair loss
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Poor digestion
  • Water retention

There are also alterations in immune function with an increase in allergies to everything, environmental chemicals, molds and foods.

Fibromyalgia Diagnosis

The diagnosis of Fibromyalgia is dependent upon the patient’s subjective descriptions of their symptoms and the physician’s exam, because there isn’t a blood test to confirm Fibromyalgia.

Without an objective way to confirm the diagnosis, the physician is often left with ruling out other similar conditions. 

Since Fibro is progressive, the early stages may not present with all the classic symptoms, and a physician may simply give the diagnosis of Fibro out of confusion, frustration and convenience.

To make this even more complicated, not everyone with the diagnosis of Fibromyalgia has the same symptoms.

The degree of pain and the extent of insomnia and fatigue varies from one person to the next. 

Other issues can be present as well, such as sensitivity to smells, bright lights, sounds, weather changes, to heat and cold, and to various foods.

Much research points towards the nervous system, specifically a ‘central’ problem, with pain and sensory processing issues located within the brain.

Even though a high percentage of people developed Fibromyalgia from the primary cause of spinal trauma, other origins do exist.

Secondary or Less Common Causes

We hesitate to say these are actually causes, though we’ve seen some patients where they were, but many of them simply accelerate the progression and intensity of symptoms.

  • Toxic chemical exposures
  • Intense chronic stress
  • Food allergies
  • Low-grade chronic infections
  • Parasites
  • Female hormone deficiencies
  • Injury to the ears, specifically the vestibular apparatus
  • Mold
  • Sleep apnea

Often there isn’t just one of these causes involved, but a combination of several.

Call Us Today To Schedule or 

If You Have Questions

801.875.9292

 

We Believe in Empowering Our Clients Through Education & By Providing Therapies Which Assist Their Own Innate Capacity To Heal

 

Contact Information

Clear Health Centers
3350 Highland Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84106
801.875.9292

Monday to Thursday: 9am to 4:30pm
Friday 9am-1pm
Closed Weekends and Holidays

 

 

Hours of Operation

Monday to Thursday: 9am to 4:30pm
Friday 9am-1pm
Closed Weekends and Holidays

 

Call Us Today to Schedule or Have Questions?

801.875.9292

We Believe in Empowering Our Clients Through Education
By Providing Therapies Which Assist Their
Own Innate Capacity To Heal

Contact Information

Clear Health Centers
3350 Highland Drive
Salt Lake City, Utah 84106
AdvancingCare@gmail.com

Hours of Operation

Monday to Thursday: 9am to 4:30pm
Friday 9am-1pm
Closed Weekends and Holidays