Alzheimer’s Holistic Treatment

Alzheimers Requires the Physician to
Investigate & Treat the Underlying Causes

Alzheimer's Holistic Treatment

Alzheimers Requires the Physician to
Investigate & Treat the Underlying Causes

Alzheimers

Alzheimer’s & Dementia

Alzheimer’s is defined as a form of dementia caused by the accumulation of amyloid, a sticky synapse-destroying plaque.  It is considered the CAUSE of brain nerve degeneration, neuroinflammation and cognitive decline, though this is becoming highly debatable.

Traditional research and drug development have focused upon this amyloid hypothesis over the last 40 years with little to no success.

The primary focus of drug development, spurred on by monetary funding and grant proposals to produce a potential drug, without considering multiple causes, has led to devastating statistics with an estimated 6.5 million Americans 65 and older having Alzheimer’s, striking 1 in 9 over the age of 65.

Thanks to the research of Dr. Francisco Lima-Gonzalez, Dr. Dale Bredesen, Dr. Thomas Guttuso and many others, there is definitely hope, not only for slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s but to actually reverse it.

Woman Blue Repose

Causes of Alzheimer’s

Brain biopsies have confirmed the finding of amyloid in cognitively healthy humans, so our focus on removing amyloid rather than addressing underlying causes is futile. (nih.gov)

What are these underlying causes for Alzheimer’s and dementia?

COMPROMISED OXYGEN DELIVERY

All cells, and especially brain cells, require oxygen and glucose to function optimally so any compromise with oxygen delivery leads to brain cell issues.

Low oxygen delivery (hypoxia) can be due to the narrowing of arteries leading to the brain (carotid & vertebral) which is most often caused by atherosclerosis.  The cardiovascular system’s response to this narrowing is to increase blood pressure, to promote blood flow to the brain and tissues.  Many people with high blood pressure have this narrowing. (Science Direct)

Another cause of decreased oxygen delivery to brain cells is a decline in cardiac output, meaning the heart muscle is not fully contracting.  There are several ways to improve this. (NCBI)

This decreased delivery of blood is also true for the condition of atrial and ventricular fibrillation where the heart is not fully contracting.

Another cause of low oxygen delivery relates to red blood cells.  Red cells carry oxygen which is released in the smallest blood vessels traveling through tissues and the brain. These capillaries are slightly smaller than the width of red cells, and red cells have an inherent structural component of flexibility, allowing them to fold and enter the capillaries.  For a number of reasons, red cells can loose their flexibility and thus cannot easily enter capillaries.

If our cells do not receive oxygen then their function declines, and with brain cells, this equates to cognitive issues.

Red cell membranes are composed of cholesterol and various phospholipids.  Too little cholesterol and red cells are subject to hemolysis, breaking apart.  Too much cholesterol and they become more rigid.

The other component, phospholipids, play an important role with flexibility, and if these are lacking, red cells become rigid.  The best way to improve flexibility is the use of the intravenous therapy, Plaquex.  There is also an oral form of specific phospholipids.

From all the above, this state of hypoxia causes the shrinking of brain cells (atrophy) which is known to increase beta amyloid proteins. (NCBI)

BLOOD SUGAR DYSREGULATION

Over 80% of people with Alzheimer’s have Type II Diabetes.  Insulin resistance is another term used for pre-diabetes and diabetes where insulin levels are elevated, trying to deliver glucose into cells.  High insulin leads to inflammation of nerves in the body and brain which also promotes amyloid deposition. (keck.usc)

There is such a high prevalence of Type II Diabetes having Alzheimer’s that a new term or label has become fashionable, Type III Diabetes. (NCBI.gov)

What’s going on?

An enzyme called insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) metabolizes or breaks down insulin.  This enzyme also degrades amyloid plaque.  With diabetes and elevated insulin, this enzyme declines over time.  Reduced IDE activity is associated with the etiology and development of Alzheimer’s. (PNAS.org)

Along with the goal of treating Alzheimer’s by lowering insulin, women can include bio-identical estradiol to increase IDE.

HOMOCYSTEINE

Elevated homocysteine causes inflammation which damages blood vessels in the brain.  High levels are most often due to deficiencies of vitamins B12, B6 and folic acid.

From the journal Brain, ‘These results support the hypothesis that higher plasma homocysteine levels are associated with more atrophy of the hippocampus and cortical regions in elderly at risk of Alzheimer’s disease.’ (pubmed.gov)

High levels are also associated with atherosclerosis, heart attacks, strokes and pulmonary embolisms.

IRON

Iron overload leads to iron deposits in brain cells which impairs normal cognitive function and behavior.  Excess iron causes hydroxyl free radicals and increased oxidative stress, damages cell lipids (membranes), increases the deposition of amyloid plaque, the formation of fibrillary tangles, and can ultimately lead to cellular death. (Frontiersin.org)

The blood test to determine if iron is an issue is ferritin.

THYROID

Low thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) is another risk factor of dementia and Alzheimer’s.  A full panel for thyroid hormones includes TSH, T4, Free T4 and Free T3. (AlzheimersResearch)

With every cell in the body and brain requiring optimal thyroid hormones, these hormones must be assessed.

BDNF

A synapse links one brain cell to the next in line and its function is vital for the transmission of signals related to cognition and memory.  Among synapse-strengthening compounds, Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor is most important. (BiomedCentral.com)

To increase BDNF, exercise, estrogens (estradiol), testosterone, vitamin D and folic acid should be investigated and optimized.

INFECTIONS

Research in the journal Science Translation Medicine (2016) indicates that ‘beta amyloid is a natural antibiotic that protects the brain from infection’ which ‘traps and imprisons bacterial pathogens.’ (Science.org)

As a form of protection, amyloid deposits will increase when there is a systemic bacterial infection. (ncbi.org)

Various bacteria and mold spores act as irritants which trigger an immune response leading to inflammation of the brain, causing impaired cognitive function. (pubmed.org)

Research in the journal Aging discovered a relationship between one type of Alzheimer’s with exposure to inhaled mycotoxins from mold, namely Stachybotrys, Penicillium and Aspergillus. (ncbi.org)

HEAVY METALS

Lead, cadmium, mercury and manganese have been implicated in the cause of neurofibrillary tangles, aggregation of amyloid beta peptides, and neuronal cell loss. (academic.com)

One research paper demonstrated axon (nerve body) degeneration and formation of neurofibrillary tangles in animal neuronal cell cultures within minutes, with the lowest doses of inorganic mercury. (pubmed.org)

From Current Environmental Health Reports (Metals & Health), ‘We provide a cohesive synthesis of the animal studies that have focused on neural mechanisms of dysfunction after arsenic exposure including altered epigenetics; hippocampal function; glucocorticoid and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) pathway signaling; glutamatergic, cholinergic and monoaminergic signaling; adult neurogenesis; and increases Alzheimer’s-associated pathologies.’ (mdpi.com)

SEX HORMONE IMBALANCES

From the journal Neurodegenerative Diseases, ‘We hypothesize that both hysterectomy and oophorectomy may have harmful brain effects.’ (karger.com)

Other research literature points to suboptimal levels of sex hormones play a part in the development of cognitive decline.

MAST CELL ACTIVATION SYNDROME

Inflammation in the nervous system, termed ‘Neuroinflammation,’ has become increasingly recognized as being associated with neurodegenerative diseases.  Mast cells located in the brain and central nervous system are ‘first responders’ to injury. (ncbi.gov)

Mast cells exert profound effects on their microenvironment and neighboring cells including behavior and/or activation of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons, which, in turn, are implicated in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

Mast cells also increase the permeability of the blood brain barrier enabling toxins and immune cell entry which exacerbates an inflammatory microenvironment.

Although antihistamines will decrease mast cell activity to help with various cognitive issues, it is essential to investigate the underlying triggers for histamine release from mast cells.

Triggers can be various toxins, food allergies, mold, bacteria, and others.

GENETICS

Certainly genetics may play a role, the APOE 3&4, yet this accounts for only 1 in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s.  Therefore, all the above causes for the decline in cognition and the development of plaque must be investigated.

Neurons

Investigating the Causes of Alzheimer’s

So how do we determine which of these causes are underlying the development of Alzheimer’s and dementia?

We begin with the labs listed below.

APOE 3 &4

This lab is useful to know the role of genetics might be playing

LIPID PANEL

Since brain cells have a lipid or fatty membrane composes of 50% cholesterol, low cholesterol can play a part in cognitive decline.  Some research warns about the use of lipid lowering drugs with Alzheimer’s cases.

HOMOCYSTEINE

If elevated can cause inflammation and damage to blood vessels in the brain.  It will also indicate the need for various B vitamins.

FIBRINOGEN

This protein converts to fibrin and induces coagulation of blood, making it thick. Fibrin deposits have been found in amyloid in brain tissues and blood vessels of Alzheimer’s patients.

FASTING INSULIN

We want to know if it is elevated which would cause the lowering of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE).

VITAMIN D

Vitamin D participates in the clearance of amyloid plaque, thus low levels are associated with a greater risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s.  Optimal D is between 60-70.

COPPER TO ZINC RATIO

Excess copper can lead to increased amyloid.

HEMOGLOBIN A1c

This result shows the average blood glucose over the last 3 months.  It can tell us about diabetes and also screens for hypoglycemia.  Remember that all cells require glucose and oxygen.  Increased HA1c equates to elevated insulin.

VITAMIN B12

Shown to slow down the progression of mild cognitive impairment.

D-DIMER

If elevated predicts the tendency to form blood clots which would inhibit the flow of blood to the brain, leading to hypoxia.

THYROID HORMONES

TSH, T4, Free T4 and Free T3.

SEX HORMONES

This includes estradiol, estriol, progesterone and testosterone.

COMPREHENSIVE METABOLIC PANEL

There are many results in this panel including the assessment of kidneys and liver.

COMPLETE BLOOD COUNT

This checks both red and white blood cells.  Low red blood cells or anemia would certainly compromise oxygen delivery to brain cells.  Elevated or diminished white blood cells can indicate an infection.

HEAVY METALS

To check for heavy metals, a urine test is best since blood testing for heavy metals is very limited.  To provoke metals stuck in tissues requires intravenous chelation prior to urine collection.

If atherosclerosis is suspected, the best means of assessment is the Carotid Artery Intima ultrasonogram. We recommend this test done by Life Screening here in Utah.

There is also the Ankle-Brachial Index, comparing blood pressure readings on the ankle and elbow.  If pressure is lower in the ankle this points towards poor circulation, most likely due to atherosclerosis.

To determine is there is a bacterial or mold issue we examine a tiny finger prick of blood under a microscope.

Natural Therapies

Favorite Therapies for Alzheimer’s

Besides, or in addition to, various supplements and hormones to correct biochemical and hormonal imbalances, there are specific approaches to recovering from Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Thomas Guttuso, MD

This physician serendipitously discovered the use of lithium, a trace mineral, for both Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

Typically used in higher doses of 300 mgs for bipolar issues, one of his Parkinson’s patients was relieved of his intentional tremor on 150 mgs.

Digging further into research he found that cognitive issues declined on a much lower dose of lithium, between 0.3 mgs and 30 mgs.  Since there are no known side effects at these lower doses, lithium has great potential.

Using the aspartate form rather than the carbonate form, lithium lowers inflammation, protects the nerves from various toxic insults, reduces oxidative stress, increases mitochondrial function, increases hippocampus and prefrontal cortex activity, decreases neuronal cell death, and increases the synthesis of BDNF.

Dr. Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, MD.

After decades of studying dementia and Alzheimer’s, who also refutes the origin of Alzheimer’s being an amyloid overgrowth, focuses on enhancing and increasing brain cell function by increasing mitochondrial production of ATP.  ATP is what powers the function in whatever cell they reside in, and a single brain neuron cell can have thousands of mitochondria.

After years of experimenting with numerous compounds to increase mitochondrial function, the one which proved to be highly effective was methylene blue.

Methylene Blue was the first synthesized dye to be used in the textile industry in the late 1800s.

It was the first synthetic medicine with antimicrobial properties, successful in the treatment of malaria (1882).

Further research has unveiled its antiviral and anti-fungal properties.  Methylene Blue can be taken orally as well as intravenously.

Dr. Dale Bredesen, MD

This clinician places a strong emphasis on the causes of inflammation such as mineral imbalances, nutrient deficiencies, hormonal imbalances, toxic metals, mold and toxic chemicals.  His approach, after investigating causes, is primarily diet and supplements.

Dr. Jack C. de la Torre, MD

Author of ‘Alzheimer’s Turning Point’ supports the strong connection between vascular disorders being the underlying cause of neurodegenerative consequences, leading to Alzheimer’s.

mental health

Summary & Procedures

The most important first step of any physician is to investigate all the causes for why a person is unwell.

This is partially done through the lab testing mentioned previously. It is also through taking a good case to understand the progression of an illness.  Asking the right questions and being a good listener are vital.

If you are interested in proceeding, follow these step.

Call our clinic (801.875.9292).

Speak with our receptionist and mention having read about Alzheimer’s on out site and you would like to speak with Dr. Haskell before making an appointment.

You can ask any questions of Dr. Haskell and he will likely have questions for you.

You will then be forwarded our intake questionnaire to complete on your computer and returned to us.  Please be sure to forward any labs you have.

When the completed intake and labs have been returned, you will be called to schedule your first appointment which lasts one and a half hours.  The charge for this is $300.

During this initial visit you will be asked many questions about the details of your symptoms, your medical history, other health issues, your exposure to chemicals in the past, nutritional habits, dental issues, surgeries, and more.

Haskell will also view at a tiny finger prick of blood under a darkfield microscope to examine your red and white blood cells and if there’s any bacteria or mold issues.

He will do the ankle brachial blood pressure readings to see if atherosclerosis might be an issue.

Using Electro-Dermal screening, he will check the flow of energy or chi through various acupuncture meridians.

All the above will provide the information necessary to know which lab tests are most important to run.

We hope it is obvious that labs would not be run before your first visit since Haskell couldn’t select labs until he’s able to understand which are necessary.

If you have health insurance, he will write a letter with the list of labs and the proper ICD diagnostic codes for insurance coverage.  This coding does not guarantee your insurance company will be willing to cover all the labs.

You also have the option of paying us for labs and this will be discussed during your first visit.

After this visit Haskell may recommend a few supplements and therapies but more specific suggestions will be made after reviewing your labs with you.

This second visit to interpret labs is scheduled for a half hour, either in person or over the phone.  The charge is $125.

Health Savings Plans can be used to cover appointments and various therapies.

Alzheimers

Dementia & Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s is defined as a form of dementia caused by the accumulation of amyloid, a sticky synapse-destroying plaque.  It is considered the CAUSE of brain nerve degeneration, neuroinflammation and cognitive decline, though this is becoming highly debatable.

Traditional research and drug development have focused upon this amyloid hypothesis over the last 40 years with little to no success.

The primary focus of drug development, spurred on by monetary funding and grant proposals to produce a potential drug, without considering multiple causes, has led to devastating statistics with an estimated 6.5 million Americans 65 and older having Alzheimer’s, striking 1 in 9 over the age of 65.

Thanks to the research of Dr. Francisco Lima-Gonzalez, Dr. Dale Bredesen, Dr. Thomas Guttuso and many others, there is definitely hope, not only for slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s but to actually reverse it.

Woman Blue Repose

Causes of Alzheimer’s

Brain biopsies have confirmed the finding of amyloid in cognitively healthy humans, so our focus on removing amyloid rather than addressing underlying causes is futile. (nih.gov)

What are these underlying causes for Alzheimer’s and dementia?

COMPROMISED OXYGEN DELIVERY

All cells, and especially brain cells, require oxygen and glucose to function optimally so any compromise with oxygen delivery leads to brain cell issues.

Low oxygen delivery (hypoxia) can be due to the narrowing of arteries leading to the brain (carotid & vertebral) which is most often caused by atherosclerosis.  The cardiovascular system’s response to this narrowing is to increase blood pressure, to promote blood flow to the brain and tissues.  Many people with high blood pressure have this narrowing. (Science Direct)

Another cause of decreased oxygen delivery to brain cells is a decline in cardiac output, meaning the heart muscle is not fully contracting.  There are several ways to improve this. (NCBI)

This decreased delivery of blood is also true for the condition of atrial and ventricular fibrillation where the heart is not fully contracting.

Another cause of low oxygen delivery relates to red blood cells.  Red cells carry oxygen which is released in the smallest blood vessels traveling through tissues and the brain. These capillaries are slightly smaller than the width of red cells, and red cells have an inherent structural component of flexibility, allowing them to fold and enter the capillaries.  For a number of reasons, red cells can loose their flexibility and thus cannot easily enter capillaries.

If our cells do not receive oxygen then their function declines, and with brain cells, this equates to cognitive issues.

Red cell membranes are composed of cholesterol and various phospholipids.  Too little cholesterol and red cells are subject to hemolysis, breaking apart.  Too much cholesterol and they become more rigid.

The other component, phospholipids, play an important role with flexibility, and if these are lacking, red cells become rigid.  The best way to improve flexibility is the use of the intravenous therapy, Plaquex.  There is also an oral form of specific phospholipids.

From all the above, this state of hypoxia causes the shrinking of brain cells (atrophy) which is known to increase beta amyloid proteins. (NCBI)

BLOOD SUGAR DYSREGULATION

Over 80% of people with Alzheimer’s have Type II Diabetes.  Insulin resistance is another term used for pre-diabetes and diabetes where insulin levels are elevated, trying to deliver glucose into cells.  High insulin leads to inflammation of nerves in the body and brain which also promotes amyloid deposition. (keck.usc)

There is such a high prevalence of Type II Diabetes having Alzheimer’s that a new term or label has become fashionable, Type III Diabetes. (NCBI.gov)

What’s going on?

An enzyme called insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) metabolizes or breaks down insulin.  This enzyme also degrades amyloid plaque.  With diabetes and elevated insulin, this enzyme declines over time.  Reduced IDE activity is associated with the etiology and development of Alzheimer’s. (PNAS.org)

Along with the goal of treating Alzheimer’s by lowering insulin, women can include bio-identical estradiol to increase IDE.

HOMOCYSTEINE

Elevated homocysteine causes inflammation which damages blood vessels in the brain.  High levels are most often due to deficiencies of vitamins B12, B6 and folic acid.

From the journal Brain, ‘These results support the hypothesis that higher plasma homocysteine levels are associated with more atrophy of the hippocampus and cortical regions in elderly at risk of Alzheimer’s disease.’ (pubmed.gov)

High levels are also associated with atherosclerosis, heart attacks, strokes and pulmonary embolisms.

IRON

Iron overload leads to iron deposits in brain cells which impairs normal cognitive function and behavior.  Excess iron causes hydroxyl free radicals and increased oxidative stress, damages cell lipids (membranes), increases the deposition of amyloid plaque, the formation of fibrillary tangles, and can ultimately lead to cellular death. (Frontiersin.org)

The blood test to determine if iron is an issue is ferritin.

THYROID

Low thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) is another risk factor of dementia and Alzheimer’s.  A full panel for thyroid hormones includes TSH, T4, Free T4 and Free T3. (AlzheimersResearch)

With every cell in the body and brain requiring optimal thyroid hormones, these hormones must be assessed.

BDNF

A synapse links one brain cell to the next in line and its function is vital for the transmission of signals related to cognition and memory.  Among synapse-strengthening compounds, Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor is most important. (BiomedCentral.com)

To increase BDNF, exercise, estrogens (estradiol), testosterone, vitamin D and folic acid should be investigated and optimized.

INFECTIONS

Research in the journal Science Translation Medicine (2016) indicates that ‘beta amyloid is a natural antibiotic that protects the brain from infection’ which ‘traps and imprisons bacterial pathogens.’ (Science.org)

As a form of protection, amyloid deposits will increase when there is a systemic bacterial infection. (ncbi.org)

Various bacteria and mold spores act as irritants which trigger an immune response leading to inflammation of the brain, causing impaired cognitive function. (pubmed.org)

Research in the journal Aging discovered a relationship between one type of Alzheimer’s with exposure to inhaled mycotoxins from mold, namely Stachybotrys, Penicillium and Aspergillus. (ncbi.org)

HEAVY METALS

Lead, cadmium, mercury and manganese have been implicated in the cause of neurofibrillary tangles, aggregation of amyloid beta peptides, and neuronal cell loss. (academic.com)

One research paper demonstrated axon (nerve body) degeneration and formation of neurofibrillary tangles in animal neuronal cell cultures within minutes, with the lowest doses of inorganic mercury. (pubmed.org)

From Current Environmental Health Reports (Metals & Health), ‘We provide a cohesive synthesis of the animal studies that have focused on neural mechanisms of dysfunction after arsenic exposure including altered epigenetics; hippocampal function; glucocorticoid and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) pathway signaling; glutamatergic, cholinergic and monoaminergic signaling; adult neurogenesis; and increases Alzheimer’s-associated pathologies.’ (mdpi.com)

SEX HORMONE IMBALANCES

From the journal Neurodegenerative Diseases, ‘We hypothesize that both hysterectomy and oophorectomy may have harmful brain effects.’ (karger.com)

Other research literature points to suboptimal levels of sex hormones play a part in the development of cognitive decline.

MAST CELL ACTIVATION SYNDROME

Inflammation in the nervous system, termed ‘Neuroinflammation,’ has become increasingly recognized as being associated with neurodegenerative diseases.  Mast cells located in the brain and central nervous system are ‘first responders’ to injury. (ncbi.gov)

Mast cells exert profound effects on their microenvironment and neighboring cells including behavior and/or activation of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons, which, in turn, are implicated in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

Mast cells also increase the permeability of the blood brain barrier enabling toxins and immune cell entry which exacerbates an inflammatory microenvironment.

Although antihistamines will decrease mast cell activity to help with various cognitive issues, it is essential to investigate the underlying triggers for histamine release from mast cells.

Triggers can be various toxins, food allergies, mold, bacteria, and others.

GENETICS

Certainly genetics may play a role, the APOE 3&4, yet this accounts for only 1 in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s.  Therefore, all the above causes for the decline in cognition and the development of plaque must be investigated.

Neurons

Investigating the Causes of Alzheimer’s

So how do we determine which of these causes are underlying the development of Alzheimer’s and dementia?

We begin with the labs listed below.

APOE 3 &4

This lab is useful to know the role of genetics might be playing

LIPID PANEL

Since brain cells have a lipid or fatty membrane composes of 50% cholesterol, low cholesterol can play a part in cognitive decline.  Some research warns about the use of lipid lowering drugs with Alzheimer’s cases.

HOMOCYSTEINE

If elevated can cause inflammation and damage to blood vessels in the brain.  It will also indicate the need for various B vitamins.

FIBRINOGEN

This protein converts to fibrin and induces coagulation of blood, making it thick. Fibrin deposits have been found in amyloid in brain tissues and blood vessels of Alzheimer’s patients.

FASTING INSULIN

We want to know if it is elevated which would cause the lowering of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE).

VITAMIN D

Vitamin D participates in the clearance of amyloid plaque, thus low levels are associated with a greater risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s.  Optimal D is between 60-70.

COPPER TO ZINC RATIO

Excess copper can lead to increased amyloid.

HEMOGLOBIN A1c

This result shows the average blood glucose over the last 3 months.  It can tell us about diabetes and also screens for hypoglycemia.  Remember that all cells require glucose and oxygen.  Increased HA1c equates to elevated insulin.

VITAMIN B12

Shown to slow down the progression of mild cognitive impairment.

D-DIMER

If elevated predicts the tendency to form blood clots which would inhibit the flow of blood to the brain, leading to hypoxia.

THYROID HORMONES

TSH, T4, Free T4 and Free T3.

SEX HORMONES

This includes estradiol, estriol, progesterone and testosterone.

COMPREHENSIVE METABOLIC PANEL

There are many results in this panel including the assessment of kidneys and liver.

COMPLETE BLOOD COUNT

This checks both red and white blood cells.  Low red blood cells or anemia would certainly compromise oxygen delivery to brain cells.  Elevated or diminished white blood cells can indicate an infection.

HEAVY METALS

To check for heavy metals, a urine test is best since blood testing for heavy metals is very limited.  To provoke metals stuck in tissues requires intravenous chelation prior to urine collection.

If atherosclerosis is suspected, the best means of assessment is the Carotid Artery Intima ultrasonogram. We recommend this test done by Life Screening here in Utah.

There is also the Ankle-Brachial Index, comparing blood pressure readings on the ankle and elbow.  If pressure is lower in the ankle this points towards poor circulation, most likely due to atherosclerosis.

To determine is there is a bacterial or mold issue we examine a tiny finger prick of blood under a microscope.

Natural Therapies

Favorite Therapies for Alzheimer’s

Besides, or in addition to, various supplements and hormones to correct biochemical and hormonal imbalances, there are specific approaches to recovering from Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Thomas Guttuso, MD

This physician serendipitously discovered the use of lithium, a trace mineral, for both Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

Typically used in higher doses of 300 mgs for bipolar issues, one of his Parkinson’s patients was relieved of his intentional tremor on 150 mgs.

Digging further into research he found that cognitive issues declined on a much lower dose of lithium, between 0.3 mgs and 30 mgs.  Since there are no known side effects at these lower doses, lithium has great potential.

Using the aspartate form rather than the carbonate form, lithium lowers inflammation, protects the nerves from various toxic insults, reduces oxidative stress, increases mitochondrial function, increases hippocampus and prefrontal cortex activity, increases neuronal cell death, and decreases the synthesis of BDNF.

Dr. Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, MD.

After decades of studying dementia and Alzheimer’s, who also refutes the origin of Alzheimer’s being an amyloid overgrowth, focuses on enhancing and increasing brain cell function by increasing mitochondrial production of ATP.  ATP is what powers the function in whatever cell they reside in, and a single brain neuron cell can have thousands of mitochondria.

After years of experimenting with numerous compounds to increase mitochondrial function, the one which proved to be highly effective was methylene blue.

Methylene Blue was the first synthesized dye to be used in the textile industry in the late 1800s.

It was the first synthetic medicine with antimicrobial properties, successful in the treatment of malaria (1882).

Further research has unveiled its antiviral and anti-fungal properties.  Methylene Blue can be taken orally as well as intravenously.

Dr. Dale Bredesen, MD

This clinician places a strong emphasis on the causes of inflammation such as mineral imbalances, nutrient deficiencies, hormonal imbalances, toxic metals, mold and toxic chemicals.  His approach, after investigating causes, is primarily diet and supplements.

Dr. Jack C. de la Torre, MD

Author of ‘Alzheimer’s Turning Point’ supports the strong connection between vascular disorders being the underlying cause of neurodegenerative consequences, leading to Alzheimer’s.

mental health

Summary & Procedures

The most important first step of any physician is to investigate all the causes for why a person is unwell.

This is partially done through the lab testing mentioned previously. It is also through taking a good case to understand the progression of an illness.  Asking the right questions and being a good listener are vital.

If you are interested in proceeding, follow these step.

Call our clinic (801.875.9292).

Speak with our receptionist and mention having read about Alzheimer’s on out site and you would like to speak with Dr. Haskell before making an appointment.

You can ask any questions of Dr. Haskell and he will likely have questions for you.

You will then be forwarded our intake questionnaire to complete on your computer and returned to us.  Please be sure to forward any labs you have.

When the completed intake and labs have been returned, you will be called to schedule your first appointment which lasts one and a half hours.  The charge for this is $300.

During this initial visit you will be asked many questions about the details of your symptoms, your medical history, other health issues, your exposure to chemicals in the past, nutritional habits, dental issues, surgeries, and more.

Haskell will also view at a tiny finger prick of blood under a darkfield microscope to examine your red and white blood cells and if there’s any bacteria or mold issues.

He will do the ankle brachial blood pressure readings to see if atherosclerosis might be an issue.

Using Electro-Dermal screening, he will check the flow of energy or chi through various acupuncture meridians.

All the above will provide the information necessary to know which lab tests are most important to run.

We hope it is obvious that labs would not be run before your first visit since Haskell couldn’t select labs until he’s able to understand which are necessary.

If you have health insurance, he will write a letter with the list of labs and the proper ICD diagnostic codes for insurance coverage.  This coding does not guarantee your insurance company will be willing to cover all the labs.

You also have the option of paying us for labs and this will be discussed during your first visit.

After this visit Haskell may recommend a few supplements and therapies but more specific suggestions will be made after reviewing your labs with you.

This second visit to interpret labs is scheduled for a half hour, either in person or over the phone.  The charge is $125.

Health Savings Plans can be used to cover appointments and various therapies.